Rachel Sweeney

Rachel Sweeney

Practicing Movement Artist

Rachel is a practicing movement artist whose research is informed by studies in posthumanism, geopolitics and art activism. Her transdisciplinary work is grounded in ecological approaches to decolonizing body-place relationships, engaging creatively and imaginatively with cultural heritage and sustainability discourses.

Rachel’s work in Higher Education seeks to expand upon current artistic and ecological knowledge exchange and her research has been supported internationally through the Arts and Humanities Research Council UK, Creative Ireland and CSIRO Australia.

She was Head of Dance Studies at Liverpool Hope University (2010-2021), and has taught dance at the University of Plymouth, the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, and the University of Chichester. She currently leads on the Master’s program in Movement Mind and Ecology at Schumacher College in Devon.

She was Visiting Fellow for the Humanities Research Centre at the Australian National University (2012), and Centre Fellow for the Centre for Sustainable Futures at the University of Plymouth (2007-08), working across traditional academic structures to promote sensory based scholarship through embedding community and translocal knowledge exchange.

She first met with Maria Kerin through the European experimental heritage project Karum Creevagh and since 2019 they have been developing The Floating Village, actively applying somatic practice in non-traditional arts spaces and for diverse communities.

Communities / Identities – Jeannette Mollenhauer, Kathryn Stamp, Rachel Sweeney, Maria Kerin + Q&A

Presentations

Presentations on the intersection between dance disability and public interventions in the UK, the historical erasure of Irish dance in Australia, and the fostering of transnational academic and artistic dialogues through technology. Mollenhauer’s presentation argues that although Irish dance currently enjoys a measure of civic prominence, its contribution to the archive of Australian dance practice is “missing”. […]

READ MORE